Easy and Valuable Hammock Modifications

I really can’t praise Clark Hammocks enough for the NX-270. This Cadillac of the hammock camping world has kept me dry and comfortable in torrential downpours on the Lone Star Hiking Trail near Houston Texas, kept me warm on some of my favorite Indiana trails during the spring and fall and more recently gave me a much needed reprieve from the bugs on the Knobstone Trail in southern Indiana. It’s roomy with plenty of storage space for gear, and very comfortable to sleep in even for bigger gentlemen like myself. But if you’ve ever spent an entire day walking through the wilderness you know the last thing you want to do when you stop for the day is spend 45 minutes setting up camp. This was one of the many reasons I switched to hammock camping in the first place. But some of the adjustments I’ve made to my hammock setup in the last year might help you save some precious time when you stop for the day to make camp after a long day on the trail.

(Below is my setup BEFORE modification. You can see the closest rope hanging close to the tree. Total setup time here was approximately 35 minutes due to the conditions.)

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While my Clark NX-270 was pretty incredible right out of the box, I found that it was sometimes taking me upwards of 30 minutes to make camp at the end of the day because of issues with the nylon ropes tangling or my knots coming loose. Additionally, almost everywhere that I went hiking down south required tree straps to be used for anyone that was out hammock camping. So after dealing with tying and untying wet nylon rope in the rain on the Lone Star Trail I decided that I needed to make a change.

I started by getting a nice set of “atlas straps” and researching lightweight / high quality carabiners. Once I had done my research I purchased the gear and “cut the cord” with my Clark’s nylon ropes. By using atlas tree straps that give you a lot of leeway when choosing hammocking trees and sturdy lightweight climbing carabiners with screw locks I was able to cut my camp setup time down from around 30 minutes to about 5 minutes. Meaning that I can stay on the trail longer if I need to without having to plan for such a big window to setup camp before dark. It’s now as easy as looping the straps around a tree and clipping in my hammock. This also lets me make quick adjustments if I need to, without untying, adjusting and retying any rope. The carabiners also serve as drip rings to prevent rain from wetting the hammock during heavy rain storms. So far these modifications have made a world of difference for me, and I hope the idea can help you.

(Below is my setup after modification, very hard to tell at first look. But setup time is reduced significantly without impacting functionality)

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For me, that extra time at the end of the day means getting to eat dinner in the remaining sunlight and, getting a nice fire going if the trail allows it. I’ve provided links below to the basic gear I’ve used for my setup.

Clark NX-270 ($389) – https://junglehammock.com/product/nx-270-tent-hammock-4-season-backpacking/

Domum 25KN Super Lightweight Carabiner Clip ($8.99 each) – https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LVY1L1I/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

HangTight Hammock Straps ($16.95) – https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00YFH8498/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Dante’s Loop at Purgatory Creek

Purgatory Creek is a lengthy set of out and back trails located in San Marcos, Texas that is easily accessible and offers a variety of trail types depending on what you’re looking for. Dante’s Loop is a 7.9 mile trail within the 463-acre Purgatory Creek Natural Area that, as my wife and I found out the hard way, is prone to being washed out during the rainy season in Texas Hill Country.

This trail was rocky, but offered great views of the surrounding preserve and its wildlife and I highly recommend paying it a visit if you’re ever in the area. With that being said, we got a little more adventure than we were looking for on our trip. Being located in South Texas the temp was in the high 90s and as we closed in on the “loop” potion of the trail, which is really just a detour around part of the forest that is prone to flooding in other parts of the year. As we approached the loop we noticed a well-worn trail leading off straight and looked like it would connect us to the far side of the loop and take out about a mile of the “loop”. So my shortcut senses started tingling and I convinced my wife to take the trail with me…

Shortcut

(Circled portion is my now infamous “shortcut”)

20 minutes of walking later we find that this trail leads to a retention wall and that the trail we need to get to is on the other side. Not wanting to admit defeat I convince my loving wife that if we just continue moving forward we’ll somehow find our way around the retention wall and on the right side of retention wall, as I can see from the GPS on my phone and a trusty alltrails.com map that we’re only about a quarter mile from the part of the trail we’re trying to get to. However, the hillside that we needed to walk through in that direction had been washed out recently and was strewn with forest debris. Nevertheless we continued in my predetermined direction… for about 500 feet, at which point a large hawthorn branch that my wife stepped on decided to get better acquainted with her leg and proceeded do so by introducing a large thorn about an inch into the side of her calf while simultaneously scratching the absolute hell out of the rest of her leg. Que the “I love my husband so much” dialogue, or something like that.

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At this point I fearlessly decide that the only way we’re going to safely get to where we’re trying to go is by getting ourselves up and over this retention wall as quickly as we can. And so we start our way up, climbing boulder by boulder up roughly 80 to 100 feet of elevation. Once we made it to the top we find that we’re in the middle of a gated area that reads “restricted area, do not enter” on the opposite side of the fence from where we are. Oh how I love my GPS. After a quick survey of the surrounding area we see a small gap in the fencing on the opposite side of the retention wall where a drainage culvert passes through. So down we go once again over the boulders that make up the retention wall. We make it to the culvert and through the fence as my wife continues the “I love my husband so much” dialogue that is very well deserved at this point and finally make it back to the trail, completing my “shortcut” and quickly making our way back up the trail to the parking lot so that we can doctor her leg up and get her out of her now blood-soaked sock.

So the moral of that short story is, Purgatory Creek has some awesome trails but men are terrible with shortcuts, so just stay on the path.

Below are some of my favorite pictures from the trail.

Directions and further information is available in the link below. https://www.alltrails.com/explore/trail/us/texas/purgatory-creek-natural-area

Happy Trails!

P.S. “I love my husband so much” may actually sound like every curse word in the English language when on a “shortcut”, sometimes you just have to read between the lines.

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Panther Canyon Nature Trail

Panther Canyon is a short 1.7 mile out and back trail located in New Braunfels, Tx and is accessible via Landa Park. The trail offers a few water features in the park that are flowing year round and a seasonal creek that flows next to the trail, the trail is flat and serves as a nice afternoon getaway for even the most casual hikers/ backpackers. While this is a short hike it is very rocky and can be rough on the feet if you don’t wear appropriate footwear. Additionally, the end of the trail borders on private property and while we were out on this occasion there were unsupervised children throwing rocks at people on the trail (us included). But don’t let that deter you from getting out and enjoying this amazing slice of Texas nature.

Directions and further information are available in the link below.

https://www.alltrails.com/explore/trail/us/texas/panther-canyon-trail

Here are some of my favorite snapshots from this hike.

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