Paw Paw Trail at Fall Creek Falls

The Paw Paw Trail is a 3 mile moderately trafficked loop trail at Fall Creek Falls State Park near Pikeville, TN that features an incredible waterfall view and a scenic overlook that is breathtaking in its own respect. This is a great day hike, but access to the falls is via a very strenuous cable trail that is a mix between hand over fist rock climbing and rappelling (not really that intense but it seems like it) in some areas.

However, if you’re looking for a great weekend trip that can be completed in an afternoon, this is the trail for you.

As always, I’ve added some of my favorite pictures from the trip (and a couple videos) below.

Cane Creek Overlook

Cane creek Falls

Happy Trails!

Mammoth Cave Historic Tour

After things had slowed down following our relocation to Nashville, Tennessee in the early spring of this year. We decided to take a trip up to the Bluegrass State and take a tour of Mammoth Cave back in June. I’d already been once as a child, but locations like this are always worth a trip as an adult. My wife had never been at all. For our first trip, we decided to take the 2-mile Historic Tour that focuses mainly on the portions of the cave that have been in use for tourism the longest. Since there are over 400 miles of cave in this National Park the scenery and history on this tour make for an incredible time.  The historic tour enters through the original entrance to the caves and visits some of the most famous portions of the cave. While the historic tour is a great start, there are several cave tours ranging from wheelchair accessible to real spelunking adventures and everything in between. Mammoth Cave is a great family trip, but also has attractions and tours better suited to adventurous adults.

Directions and further information are available in the link below.  https://www.nps.gov/maca/index.htm

While flash photography in the cave is prohibited. I’ve attached some of the better pictures from our trip. However, Mammoth Cave is a place you have to see in person to really respect.

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Happy Trails!

Bakers Grove Trail at Long Hunter State Park

Bakers Grove is a moderately trafficked 4 mile loop trail in Long Hunter State Park just outside of Nashville, TN. Walking at a leisurely pace and stopping to take in all of the great views of the lake we still finished in under two hours. But if you stay on trail and keep an average walking pace, this could easily be done in around an hour.

The trail is very flat and spends a good amount of time tracing the eastern bank of the J. Percy Priest Lake, but it offers a few hills and rock fields along the dirt path that make for some good pictures. All in all this is a great trail if you’re looking for a quick workout with access to water that is close to Nashville.

Since relocating to Tennessee in April I’ve been extraordinarily busy with travel and getting settled in a new place. But this will be the first of many trails that I’ll be exploring in the coming months, now that things are slowing down again. As always, I’m posting some of my favorite pictures from the trip below.

Directions and further details are provided in the link below. https://www.alltrails.com/explore/trail/us/tennessee/bakers-grove-trail

Happy Trails!

 

Easy and Valuable Hammock Modifications

I really can’t praise Clark Hammocks enough for the NX-270. This Cadillac of the hammock camping world has kept me dry and comfortable in torrential downpours on the Lone Star Hiking Trail near Houston Texas, kept me warm on some of my favorite Indiana trails during the spring and fall and more recently gave me a much needed reprieve from the bugs on the Knobstone Trail in southern Indiana. It’s roomy with plenty of storage space for gear, and very comfortable to sleep in even for bigger gentlemen like myself. But if you’ve ever spent an entire day walking through the wilderness you know the last thing you want to do when you stop for the day is spend 45 minutes setting up camp. This was one of the many reasons I switched to hammock camping in the first place. But some of the adjustments I’ve made to my hammock setup in the last year might help you save some precious time when you stop for the day to make camp after a long day on the trail.

(Below is my setup BEFORE modification. You can see the closest rope hanging close to the tree. Total setup time here was approximately 35 minutes due to the conditions.)

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While my Clark NX-270 was pretty incredible right out of the box, I found that it was sometimes taking me upwards of 30 minutes to make camp at the end of the day because of issues with the nylon ropes tangling or my knots coming loose. Additionally, almost everywhere that I went hiking down south required tree straps to be used for anyone that was out hammock camping. So after dealing with tying and untying wet nylon rope in the rain on the Lone Star Trail I decided that I needed to make a change.

I started by getting a nice set of “atlas straps” and researching lightweight / high quality carabiners. Once I had done my research I purchased the gear and “cut the cord” with my Clark’s nylon ropes. By using atlas tree straps that give you a lot of leeway when choosing hammocking trees and sturdy lightweight climbing carabiners with screw locks I was able to cut my camp setup time down from around 30 minutes to about 5 minutes. Meaning that I can stay on the trail longer if I need to without having to plan for such a big window to setup camp before dark. It’s now as easy as looping the straps around a tree and clipping in my hammock. This also lets me make quick adjustments if I need to, without untying, adjusting and retying any rope. The carabiners also serve as drip rings to prevent rain from wetting the hammock during heavy rain storms. So far these modifications have made a world of difference for me, and I hope the idea can help you.

(Below is my setup after modification, very hard to tell at first look. But setup time is reduced significantly without impacting functionality)

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For me, that extra time at the end of the day means getting to eat dinner in the remaining sunlight and, getting a nice fire going if the trail allows it. I’ve provided links below to the basic gear I’ve used for my setup.

Clark NX-270 ($389) – https://junglehammock.com/product/nx-270-tent-hammock-4-season-backpacking/

Domum 25KN Super Lightweight Carabiner Clip ($8.99 each) – https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LVY1L1I/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

HangTight Hammock Straps ($16.95) – https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00YFH8498/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Dante’s Loop at Purgatory Creek

Purgatory Creek is a lengthy set of out and back trails located in San Marcos, Texas that is easily accessible and offers a variety of trail types depending on what you’re looking for. Dante’s Loop is a 7.9 mile trail within the 463-acre Purgatory Creek Natural Area that, as my wife and I found out the hard way, is prone to being washed out during the rainy season in Texas Hill Country.

This trail was rocky, but offered great views of the surrounding preserve and its wildlife and I highly recommend paying it a visit if you’re ever in the area. With that being said, we got a little more adventure than we were looking for on our trip. Being located in South Texas the temp was in the high 90s and as we closed in on the “loop” potion of the trail, which is really just a detour around part of the forest that is prone to flooding in other parts of the year. As we approached the loop we noticed a well-worn trail leading off straight and looked like it would connect us to the far side of the loop and take out about a mile of the “loop”. So my shortcut senses started tingling and I convinced my wife to take the trail with me…

Shortcut

(Circled portion is my now infamous “shortcut”)

20 minutes of walking later we find that this trail leads to a retention wall and that the trail we need to get to is on the other side. Not wanting to admit defeat I convince my loving wife that if we just continue moving forward we’ll somehow find our way around the retention wall and on the right side of retention wall, as I can see from the GPS on my phone and a trusty alltrails.com map that we’re only about a quarter mile from the part of the trail we’re trying to get to. However, the hillside that we needed to walk through in that direction had been washed out recently and was strewn with forest debris. Nevertheless we continued in my predetermined direction… for about 500 feet, at which point a large hawthorn branch that my wife stepped on decided to get better acquainted with her leg and proceeded do so by introducing a large thorn about an inch into the side of her calf while simultaneously scratching the absolute hell out of the rest of her leg. Que the “I love my husband so much” dialogue, or something like that.

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At this point I fearlessly decide that the only way we’re going to safely get to where we’re trying to go is by getting ourselves up and over this retention wall as quickly as we can. And so we start our way up, climbing boulder by boulder up roughly 80 to 100 feet of elevation. Once we made it to the top we find that we’re in the middle of a gated area that reads “restricted area, do not enter” on the opposite side of the fence from where we are. Oh how I love my GPS. After a quick survey of the surrounding area we see a small gap in the fencing on the opposite side of the retention wall where a drainage culvert passes through. So down we go once again over the boulders that make up the retention wall. We make it to the culvert and through the fence as my wife continues the “I love my husband so much” dialogue that is very well deserved at this point and finally make it back to the trail, completing my “shortcut” and quickly making our way back up the trail to the parking lot so that we can doctor her leg up and get her out of her now blood-soaked sock.

So the moral of that short story is, Purgatory Creek has some awesome trails but men are terrible with shortcuts, so just stay on the path.

Below are some of my favorite pictures from the trail.

Directions and further information is available in the link below. https://www.alltrails.com/explore/trail/us/texas/purgatory-creek-natural-area

Happy Trails!

P.S. “I love my husband so much” may actually sound like every curse word in the English language when on a “shortcut”, sometimes you just have to read between the lines.

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Panther Canyon Nature Trail

Panther Canyon is a short 1.7 mile out and back trail located in New Braunfels, Tx and is accessible via Landa Park. The trail offers a few water features in the park that are flowing year round and a seasonal creek that flows next to the trail, the trail is flat and serves as a nice afternoon getaway for even the most casual hikers/ backpackers. While this is a short hike it is very rocky and can be rough on the feet if you don’t wear appropriate footwear. Additionally, the end of the trail borders on private property and while we were out on this occasion there were unsupervised children throwing rocks at people on the trail (us included). But don’t let that deter you from getting out and enjoying this amazing slice of Texas nature.

Directions and further information are available in the link below.

https://www.alltrails.com/explore/trail/us/texas/panther-canyon-trail

Here are some of my favorite snapshots from this hike.

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Hiking the Knobstone: Day 2

Little did we know when we began planning this trip at the end of August, that Indiana would be hit with an unseasonably warm spell at the end of September. As it turns out, the weekend we decided to hit the trail. We spent our time on this iconic Indiana trail alone due to the high heat and humidity. Temps were in the 90s and humidity was nearly as high.


Even being a hammock camper where you’re usually afforded the luxury of a gentle breeze throughout the night. Our first and what would turn out to be our only night on the Knobstone Trail was devoid of any breeze, while the temps never dipped below 78 and the humidity made for a very sticky attempt at sleep.

When morning came we broke camp with first light, I know I slept about 2 hours in total because I absolutely could not stop sweating the entire night, and I had somehow become covered with black ants during the time I set up camp. I don’t think Dad slept much more than I did. After breaking down camp and eating a quick breakfast I downed close to a liter of water  because I could already feel the dehydration setting in.


Once we started out in the trail it was immediately evident that I had no idea what I was getting into when I stepped foot on this trail.  The Knobstone is a relentless rollercoaster of steep climbs and fast descents. During the first hour and a half on the trail we progressed about 2 miles and finished nearly all of the remaining water we had on us while having to constantly swat down large spiderwebs that were strewn across the path as it seemed that we had been the only hikers on this portion of the trail in a few days. Luckily, a local trail club had anticipated a few hapless adventures taking on the trail in the current conditions and had stashed a few gallons of water at nearly every road crossing we came upon. 

We gladly refilled our water every chance we got  and continued on at a breathtakingly slow pace (my pace), taking every opportunity we had to drink water and attempt to cool down. Eventually stopping at a creek that I promptly dove into after stripping down to compression shorts. The temps were already into the high 80s and the humidity was stifling by a quarter after 10 and after slowly making our way another 2 miles we came to a road crossing that was stocked with more water gifted by trail angels. It was at this point, with sweat soaked through all of my clothing and my pack, having downed nearly 2 gallons of water in 8 miles on the trail and still feeling the effects of severe dehydration. Sitting on a log on the side of the road with my dad, I decided to end my trip on the Knobstone. At least this time around.

After getting a ride from a local thru hiker and retiree, getting some food and more water in our bellies and catching up on sleep that I’d missed in the sweatiest night that I’ve ever hammocked through. I saw the full scale of what happens when you sweat through your bug spray in prime chigger weather in Indiana.


All in all my first experience on the Knobstone was nothing close to what I was expecting it to be. But I had a good time hiking with my father and made some more memories that we can add to our future campfire stories. The Knobstone beat me down this time and left me with the worst case of chiggers that I’ve ever seen. But I’m not deterred, next time we set out to tackle this trail I’ll be better prepared for the hills, hopefully it won’t be this hot, I’ll overapply my bug spray and we’ll complete the whole thing.

We did get some cool pictures while we were out that I’ll post below.

If you’re interested in hiking the Knobstone trail, further information is available below.  https://www.in.gov/dnr/forestry/4275.htm

Happy Trails!

Hiking the Knobstone: Day 1

Well, more like day 1/4. After a morning of prep (and work for my Dad) and an hour and a half drive from Peru, Indiana to Bloomington, Indiana to meet up with Dad before rushing another hour down to Corydon to cache water and start our hike. We FINALLY hit the trail at a little after 6pm. We managed to make it a little past the 5 mike mark after hiking by headlamp for the greater part of an hour.


The first 4 miles of the trail are gently rolling hills, not too much of a bother. But once you get past the 4 mike marker the trail starts going up, and doesn’t stop for what seems like an eternity to an out of shape hiker that’s gotten used to the flat trails in Texas. So we have 1 “hill” down and so much more to go. Elevation profile added for dramatic effect.


Looking at the 40+ miles to go, and knowing what lays in store definitely gives me one of those “what the hell did I get myself into” frames of mind. But I’m determined to finish this hike while I’m back. I don’t know the next time I’ll get to hike with my father, and I want this trip to go successfully in the record books. We just happened to pick the hottest, most humid weekend of the year to accomplish it. But I guess the unforeseen challenges are what make it that much more memorable.
Anyway, after managing to set our hammocks up  by headlamp (kudos to Atlas Straps and aluminum carabiners) and sitting around a small fire to dry off and get the bugs off of us. We’re both ready to snooze in our hammocks. I know tomorrow will be challenging, but I hope I have the fortitude to overcome.

If you’re interested in hiking the Knobstone trail, further information is available below.  https://www.in.gov/dnr/forestry/4275.htm

Happy Trails!

Prepping for a 5 day hike

I’ve been planning a thru hike of the 96 mile Lone Star Hiking Trail in southeast Texas for the better part of the last 3 months. I finally fit it into my schedule for next week and I’ve been spending the last week packing, unpacking, repackaging, shaking down and repacking all of my gear for the hike. This will be the longest hike I’ve done so far by about 76 miles, I’m not apprehensive but I’m incredibly excited about starting the trip. I’m planning on using this experience to get to know myself as a long distance hiker so I can better prep my pack for what I know I use as a hiker when I’m on a long trip. I always tend to over  plan  and over pack. I won’t include a full gear list but I’ll attach a picture of what I’m taking. Feel free to critique or add any insight you may have. Since this picture I’ve broken down the food into lightweight and much smaller bags to save room and some minor weight. Pre water pack weight is 28lbs.

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Road to the AT: The Beginning

As far back as I can remember one of the things my father has always said is that he wants to thru-hike the Appalachian Trail in his lifetime. Most of the time when I was growing up this was a “someday” muse. Something he would say infrequently and I would say that I wanted to go with him, then conversation would change to something else. We always spent a lot of time outdoors when I was growing up, riding bikes, camping and exploring several acres of forest behind my grandparent’s house. The latter being a favorite past time of my siblings and I, every time there was a family get together or excuse to go to our grandparent’s, we were out in the woods. But sometime after graduating high school, while juggling a bills, work and responsibility I became a homebody. Even during my military service (aside from Afghanistan) when the day was over we were having get togethers at the house, watching movies or some other indoor activity. Even in Alaska, where there was so much to do in vast wilderness. I kick myself now for not hiking some of the awesome trails that I was within driving distance of for those years.

I didn’t really find my love for hiking until about a year ago. Just before the New Year, having struggled with increasing weight, alcoholism and marriage woes stemming from PTSD symptoms that I have been dealing with for years. Having been medicated by the VA to the point that I was numb to everything and basically going through my weekly routine like a zombie. I decided that 2016 would be a different year for me. I had gained so much weight that running was painfully hard on my knees and ankles, but walking was easy enough to manage. So after doing a few quick google searches about how to optimize calories burned while walking, I came across article after article about backpacking and hiking and just how many calories the sport burns.

Shortly after that I sent my father a cryptic “I think I’m going to start hiking this year so I can lose weight’ text. To which he replied that he would hike with me to help me lose weight and get healthy again. A few weeks later and after several hundreds of dollars’ worth of Amazon purchases to outfit myself, we picked a snowy Sunday the second week in January as our first hiking trip. We looked up local trails in the Morgan Monroe State Forest area, about a 40 minute drive from my house at the time. Once we decided to check out the “Low Gap Trail”, Dad drove up about an hour from where he lives and we set out in the fresh snow. After about an hour long 45mph drive on treacherous highways, and passing the trail twice (this picture is from a power line access ¾ of a mile down the road from the trailhead that we thought we were at) we set out.

I threw a 40 pound pack, laden down with an enormous amount of crap that I never could have used on a day hike under any circumstance, on top of my 290lb frame (at the time). Now, if you’ve never hiked on a trail in fresh snow. Imagine trying to walk uphill at a 15/25 degree incline in the finest powdery sand that you can imagine, with an extra 40 pounds on your back. Needless to say I was questioning my life choices after about the first quarter mile. We stopped at the top of the second “big” hill that we encountered and I vividly remember standing there, in the middle of nowhere with my Dad, catching my breath and watching the snow continue to fall. I remember how peaceful it was in that forest, away from the sounds of the city and people complaining about the snow and the cold and everything else that we can think of to complain about. The only sound I heard was the soft patter of snowflakes bouncing off my hat and the calamitous thumping of my heartbeat in my ears. We continued on past newly fallen trees, over a creek bed and down a ravine. About a mile and a half into the 10 mile trail when we came across a camp site completely buried in snow. So we decided to drop our packs and get a fire going to warm up. My Dad was an Eagle Scout growing up and spent most of his adult life in the Army, I spent 4 years in Alaska, soaking up extreme cold weather and deep wilderness survival skills from field problems and mandatory trainings that you get living in a place as frigid and deadly as interior Alaska. But none of that mattered to the fire pit that day. We dug the pit down to the ash base, carved the ice covered bark from the twigs we found for kindling (it had rained for days before it froze and snow came) and found some dry leaves on some standing deadwood nearby. But after 30 minutes of trying everything, including torching everything with a propane cook stove, we still had no fire.

At this point we decided that the best way to war up would be to hike back to the truck the way we came. As we were backtracking, following our footsteps from 30 minutes earlier that were already filling in with new snow, I started to realize what I’ve been missing. Sweaty and out of breath despite temps in the low teens, lamenting myself for getting so out of shape and letting something like PTSD change so much of me I started to feel like this was exactly where I was supposed to be. Out on some crazy winter adventure with my Dad, bragging about how outdoorsy we are but failing to start a fire when we really could have used it. My first of many hike therapy sessions took place on that 1.5 mile stretch of the Low Gap Trail in the fresh Indiana snow. I didn’t know it at the time, but I was about to fall in love with the outdoors again and it would change my life in more ways than I could have ever imagined.