Hiking the Knobstone: Day 2

Little did we know when we began planning this trip at the end of August, that Indiana would be hit with an unseasonably warm spell at the end of September. As it turns out, the weekend we decided to hit the trail. We spent our time on this iconic Indiana trail alone due to the high heat and humidity. Temps were in the 90s and humidity was nearly as high.


Even being a hammock camper where you’re usually afforded the luxury of a gentle breeze throughout the night. Our first and what would turn out to be our only night on the Knobstone Trail was devoid of any breeze, while the temps never dipped below 78 and the humidity made for a very sticky attempt at sleep.

When morning came we broke camp with first light, I know I slept about 2 hours in total because I absolutely could not stop sweating the entire night, and I had somehow become covered with black ants during the time I set up camp. I don’t think Dad slept much more than I did. After breaking down camp and eating a quick breakfast I downed close to a liter of water  because I could already feel the dehydration setting in.


Once we started out in the trail it was immediately evident that I had no idea what I was getting into when I stepped foot on this trail.  The Knobstone is a relentless rollercoaster of steep climbs and fast descents. During the first hour and a half on the trail we progressed about 2 miles and finished nearly all of the remaining water we had on us while having to constantly swat down large spiderwebs that were strewn across the path as it seemed that we had been the only hikers on this portion of the trail in a few days. Luckily, a local trail club had anticipated a few hapless adventures taking on the trail in the current conditions and had stashed a few gallons of water at nearly every road crossing we came upon. 

We gladly refilled our water every chance we got  and continued on at a breathtakingly slow pace (my pace), taking every opportunity we had to drink water and attempt to cool down. Eventually stopping at a creek that I promptly dove into after stripping down to compression shorts. The temps were already into the high 80s and the humidity was stifling by a quarter after 10 and after slowly making our way another 2 miles we came to a road crossing that was stocked with more water gifted by trail angels. It was at this point, with sweat soaked through all of my clothing and my pack, having downed nearly 2 gallons of water in 8 miles on the trail and still feeling the effects of severe dehydration. Sitting on a log on the side of the road with my dad, I decided to end my trip on the Knobstone. At least this time around.

After getting a ride from a local thru hiker and retiree, getting some food and more water in our bellies and catching up on sleep that I’d missed in the sweatiest night that I’ve ever hammocked through. I saw the full scale of what happens when you sweat through your bug spray in prime chigger weather in Indiana.


All in all my first experience on the Knobstone was nothing close to what I was expecting it to be. But I had a good time hiking with my father and made some more memories that we can add to our future campfire stories. The Knobstone beat me down this time and left me with the worst case of chiggers that I’ve ever seen. But I’m not deterred, next time we set out to tackle this trail I’ll be better prepared for the hills, hopefully it won’t be this hot, I’ll overapply my bug spray and we’ll complete the whole thing.

We did get some cool pictures while we were out that I’ll post below.

If you’re interested in hiking the Knobstone trail, further information is available below.  https://www.in.gov/dnr/forestry/4275.htm

Happy Trails!

Prepping for a 5 day hike

I’ve been planning a thru hike of the 96 mile Lone Star Hiking Trail in southeast Texas for the better part of the last 3 months. I finally fit it into my schedule for next week and I’ve been spending the last week packing, unpacking, repackaging, shaking down and repacking all of my gear for the hike. This will be the longest hike I’ve done so far by about 76 miles, I’m not apprehensive but I’m incredibly excited about starting the trip. I’m planning on using this experience to get to know myself as a long distance hiker so I can better prep my pack for what I know I use as a hiker when I’m on a long trip. I always tend to over  plan  and over pack. I won’t include a full gear list but I’ll attach a picture of what I’m taking. Feel free to critique or add any insight you may have. Since this picture I’ve broken down the food into lightweight and much smaller bags to save room and some minor weight. Pre water pack weight is 28lbs.

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2016 Hikes: My Favorite Pictures

We had a very active year in 2016, logging hikes in Indiana, Illinois, Tennessee/North Carolina and Texas. We put hundreds of miles on our trail shoes and even more knowledge in our heads. These are just a few of my favorites from the hundreds of pictures that we took during all of our hikes.

Be sure to follow our social media links to see the rest.

Hiking into the Future: What comes next.

I’ve been on hiatus from blog posts since a work promotion took me from Indiana to Texas to launch a new Amazon building. The move was expensive and taxing and work has been so hectic that I’ve only been able to day hike twice since relocating. But I hope to get out and start hiking more frequently again once things slow down after Christmas.

In the time since relocating I’ve struggled with my vision of Free Range Hiking and what I want to do moving forward. I initially started this about a year ago as a way to share some of the adventures that my father and I were going on during out weekend hikes. But along the way I started to see benefits to the weekend hikes that I didn’t anticipate when I started doing this.

I went from dealing with near crippling PTSD, heavily medicated by the VA to deal with my “issues” and having a severe drinking problem. In the last year I’ve managed to overcome my PTSD symptoms, no longer need to use any of the medications that I was on before and have developed a healthy respect for the bottle and what it can do if you let it take a hold of you.

For me, being out in nature is a form of healing. I feel “reset” after a day or two out in the woods. The peace and comradery that comes with hiking alone and in small groups outdoors, sharing knowledge and enjoying all of the simple things that the world has to offer is such a stark contrast to the concrete prisons that we have all become accustomed to living in that it feels almost alien at first. But after a while you start to understand that this isn’t just where you WANT to be, it’s where you NEED to be. There is something deep down within all of us that comes alive when we’re out in nature, something that dies a little bit the more we confine ourselves in our decorated dungeons that we call home, with fancy electronics and shiny cars that marry us to payments and mortgages that we resign ourselves to for our entire lives. Things and the pursuit of more things. Now when someone says something along the lines of “When it’s all over it won’t be the things that you had that you remember, it will be the experiences that you cherish” it’s almost like reading a hallmark card. The words are nice, we think about it for a moment before we go back to dreaming about that big house and fancy car that we want to get.

I don’t want to live by those rules anymore and I don’t want to chase the things that society says I need to be happy, because I don’t need them. I want to show other people that they don’t need them either. If hiking and enjoying the outdoors can help me overcome two crippling disorders without the use of medication, why not use it to help other people?

I ask myself this question almost daily now, I talk to family and friends, veteran buddies, colleagues and anyone that will listen. During these conversations I’ve found other people who have gone through the same things and found outdoor recreation to be as therapeutic as I have. So I keep asking myself, why not share this with more people? That question burns in my mind day in and day out. So I’ve finally come to the decision that I want to use the Free Range Hiking name as a platform to help other Veterans and sufferers of PTSD and other anxiety disorders. I want to use it as a way to help people who feel like the VA healthcare system or the traditional healthcare and mental health routes are not working or are not for them. During the next year I plan to establish a donation fund or possibly register FRH as a 403c Charitable organization with a mission to fund trips and outfit those in need of alternative or “hike therapy” to deal with PTSD, anxiety and depression. During this time I plan to work with members close to the organization to branch out and begin accepting applications across the country for event hosts and hike guides. Experienced, capable, qualified individuals that would be willing to donate time to help out people in their area that need these hike therapy trips. I expect the growth of FRH to be slow out of the gates and it will likely operate mainly out of Texas where I am currently located. But may also have a limited capacity in Indiana.

We will still be doing leisure hikes, posting pictures and sharing articles that we find helpful. Our ultimate goal is still to become Thru Hikers on the AT. But in the mean time we want to start helping people along the way and do our small part to make a positive impact in the world while bringing more people into the world of hiking as a way to heal from within.

Happy Trails Everyone,

Aaron